Research & Publications

Jennie Coleman

PhD Otago
Transmigration of the Pìob Mhór : the Scottish Highland Piping Tradition in the South Island of New Zealand, with particular reference to Southland, Otago and South Canterbury, to 1940.

Scottish Culture in New Zealand

  • ‘Scotch Mist? The New Zealand pipe band phenomenon, International Society for Music Education, ‘Community Music in the Multicultural Society’. Auckland College of Education, 1992.
  • ‘Dispelling the Myth: the Highland piper as a symbol of Scots colonist identity in New Zealand.’ 32nd World Conference of the International Council for Traditional Music, Berlin, 1993.
  • ‘Scottish Music in New Zealand’ in Garland Encyclopaedia of World Music, Vol 9 ed Kaeppler & Love, New York: Garland Publishing Inc., 1998.
  • ‘Scots Life & Leisure in Newest Edinburgh’ in 150 Years of Pain and Pleasure, Toil and Leisure, ed Bethhune. Proceedings of NZ Society of Genealogists National Conference, Dunedin, 1998.

Scottish Migration to New Zealand

  • John Wickliffe, 1848 -1998
  • Philip Laing, 1848-1998
  • Victory, 1848-1998
  • Blundell, 1848-1998
  • Bernicia, 1848-1998

A series of 5 commemorative books marking the 150th celebrations of the arrival of the first five ships to the Otago Free Church Settlement. NZ Studies Centre (University of Otago) & Otago Settlers Association, 2000.

  • The Heather and the Fern: Scottish Migration and New Zealand Settlement, ed Jennie Coleman & Tom Brooking. University of Otago Press, 2003.

Gaelic Culture in New Zealand

  • ‘Rekindling the Clan in southern colonial New Zealand: the piper calls the tune’. Migrations – 2nd Australian Conference for Celtic Studies, University of Sydney, 1995.
  • ‘Scots Gaelic’ in New Zealand Print Culture, ed Maslen, Harvey & Griffith. NZ Academy for the Humanities, 1997.
  • ‘Celtic in New Zealand’, Arts Faculty Seminar, National University of Ireland, Galway, April 1999.
  • ‘Fàilte dh’Aotearoa: Redefining the Gàidhealtachd in New Zealand’, Celtic Cultures in the Emigrant Context Conference, Sabhal Mor Ostaig, Isle of Skye, Scotland, 2000.
  • ‘A Gaelic Gospel Subsumed’, NZ Religious History Conference, Dunedin, 2003.
  • ‘Ceòl Mór of the South: theme and variations on an immigrant music culture’ in The Heather and the Fern: Scottish Migration and New Zealand Settlement, ed Coleman & Brooking. University of Otago Press, 2003.
  • ‘Highland voices in the antipodean wilderness: a Lament for Gaelic in New Zealand’, 11th New Zealand Language & Society Conference, University of Otago, 17-18 November, 2008

The Highland Bagpipe in New Zealand

  • ‘The North Canterbury MacKay pipes and their historical significance’ in  New Zealand Pipebandsman, Summer 1996.
  • Guest Curator “Piping the South” Exhibition, Otago Museum; 15 November 1998 – 31 January 1999.
  • ‘A Statement of Ethnicity: The Scottish Highland Bagpipe in New Zealand’, in Evans, Martin & Wooding (eds), Origins & Revivals: Proceedings of the First Australian Conference of Celtic Studies (1992). University of Sydney: Centre for Celtic Studies, 2000.

Music of the Highland Bagpipe in New Zealand

  • ‘A Repertoire Discovered: the bagpipe compositions of S R Craig’ in Canzona Vol 14 No 34, 1991.
  • ‘Migration and Survival: preservation of a piòbaireachd tradition?’ 33rd World Conference, International Council for Traditional Music, Canberra, 1995.
  • ‘”Gathering of the Clans” : the same tune by any other name?’ New Zealand Musicological Society Conference, University of Canterbury, 1996.
  • ‘To New Edinburgh via Glasgow: Scottish Highland pipe tune publications in 19th century South Island, New Zealand’ in Literature and Politics in the Celtic World: Papers from the 3rd Australian Conference of Celtic Studies, ed O’Neill & Wooding. Foundation for Celtic Studies, University of Sydney, 2000.
  • “Re-called cultural exports: the effect of ‘the Cameron boys’ on the literature of the Highland bagpipe” Nations, Diasporas, Identities Conference, Victoria University of Wellington, 27 – 30 March 2008

Highland Bagpipe Music

  • ‘Piòbaireachd : Not a Barbaric Survival’. Radio New Zealand broadcast, 1991.
  • ‘More Essential than Ornamental : grace notes and their grammar in Highland bagpipe notation’. New Zealand Musicological Society Conference, Victoria University of Wellington, 1997.

Highland Games/Caledonian Sports in New Zealand

  • ‘Sporting Culture or Culturing Sport? The Caledonian Synthesis in New Zealand’. Hocken Library New Zealand Studies Seminar Series, 1999.
  • ‘Caledonian Colour in 19th Century North Otago: games, gatherings and other antics’. AGM address, Oamaru Branch, NZ Society of Genealogists, 20 October, 2003.
  • ‘Colonial Games: redefining the Caledonian context.’ NZ Historical Association Conference, Dunedin, 28-30 November, 2003.

New Zealand Religious History

  • ‘Maori Community & Maori Prophets: Rua Kenana & Wiremu Ratana’ – the lives of significant prophetic leaders offering insight into differences between Maori & Pakeha concepts of nation; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (2000).
  • ‘A Gaelic Gospel Subsumed’, NZ Religious History Conference, Dunedin, 2003
  • ‘Plain Faith in Canterbury: from unchurched to Frontier Church in the 19th century’ NZ Religious History Conference, University of Auckland, 2008.

New Zealand Rural History

  • ‘Golden Opportunities? Merchant, Manufacturer and Pastoralist Migrants to Otago, New Zealand in the 19th Century: responses, outcomes and points of intersection.’ Migration and Countries of the South, Conference, University of Avignon, 1999.
  • ‘Frontier as Culture’ – explores the establishment of a New Zealand frontier lifestyle as reflected in popular verse and musical folklore;  HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1993-2000)

New Zealand Music History

  • ‘Maori in Pakeha Music: Alfred Hill’ – Examines the efforts of Alfred Hill to present Maori music as a nationalistic New Zealand expression to a wider European audience; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1995-2000)
  • ‘High Art Music Culture in the 1930s & 1940s’ – discussing Douglas Lilburn’s particular contribution; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1995-2000)
  • ‘Colonial Voices versus Dominion Resoundings: appealing the suppression of Alfred Hill’, NZ Historical Association Conference, Wellington, 23 – 25 November 2007.

New Zealand Social & Economic History : the Exhibition phenomenon

  • ‘From Colony to Dominion: the 1906-07 New Zealand International Exhibition, Christchurch’ – showcasing the perceptions of an emerging nation; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1995-2000).
  • ‘The New Zealand & South Seas International Exhibition, Dunedin, 1925-26’ – highlighting changes in New Zealand life since 1907 and investigating shifts in the search for a more distinctive New Zealand identity; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1995-2000).
  • ‘The New Zealand Centennial Exhibition, Wellington, 1939-40’ – tracing the extent of development as a nation; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1995-2000).

New Zealand Maori & Oceania

  • “Poi E” : A Study of One Maori Popular Song – M Mus Dissertation, University of London, 1986
  • “Aotearoa”: Case Study of a Maori Pop group.’ (M Mus Research Paper, University of London, 1985)
  • An Initial Enquiry into Waiata/Poi Relationships in Traditional Maori Chant (musical transcription of waiata & poi) – (M Mus Research Paper, University of London, 1985)
  • Catalogue & Classification of the Oceanic Musical Instrument Collection at the Horniman Museum, London. (M Mus Research Paper, University of London, 1986)
  • ‘An Indigenous New Zealand Expression: Traditional & Popular Maori Music’; Guest Lecture, ‘Music of the World’s Peoples’ programme, Dunedin College of Education, 1990 – 92.
  • ‘From Tradition to Pop: the cause and effect of creativity in “Poi E” ‘. International Society for Music Education Conference, ‘Community Music in the Multicultural Society’. Auckland College of Education, 1992.
  • ‘When Tradition Transforms: “Poi E” to ‘Pop’’. Guest Lecture, MAOR 208 Waiata, University of Otago, 1998.
  • ‘Maori Community & Maori Prophets: Rua Kenana & Wiremu Ratana’ – the lives of significant prophetic leaders offering insight into differences between Maori & Pakeha concepts of nation; HIST 218 Lecture, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (2000).

Folklore & Folk Music

  • An Annotated Index of Articles Published by the UK Chapter of the International Folk Music Council/International Council for Traditional Music, December 1974-December 1985. London: ICTM, 1986.
  • ‘Folklore & Ethnomusicology : A Critique of Current Folkloristic Views’  (M Mus Research Paper)
  • ‘Clapping Games : Notational Problems in an International Repertoire’ (M Mus Research Paper)
  • ‘Musical Folklore in the Playground’ in Music is a Family Affair. Proceedings of the NZ Society for Music Education Conference, 1992.
  • ‘Frontier as Culture’ and ‘Popular Culture in Music’ – two lectures exploring the establishment of a New Zealand frontier lifestyle as reflected in popular verse and musical culture; HIST 218, NZ Nationalism 1907-1947 (1993-2000)

Public Lectures

  • ‘John Ross & Margaret Cassells, latterly Sir John & Lady Ross: Globetrotting Visionaries & Munificent Benefactors’.  Otago Settlers Museum, ‘These are the People’ series, 1998.
  • ‘Playing the Boys at their Own Game: feminising a male music tradition’. Otago Settlers Museum, ‘Our Glorious Gals’ series, 1999.
  • ‘Pavilions on the Park: the last great New Zealand & South Seas Exhibition, Dunedin, 1925-26.’ Otago Settlers Museum, ‘Dunedin & the World, 1900-1999’ series, 2000.
  • ‘The Saltire under the Southern Cross’. National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, June 2000.
  • ‘Revisiting the Great War through a Feminine Lens: the case of Nurse Edith Cavell’; Address to the AGM, Memorial Oaks Society, North Otago; 7 November, 2003.

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